3 things to calm ASTHMA

3 things to calm ASTHMA

 

Asthma is one of the most common diseases in America, affecting nearly 1 in 12 people. It can affect anyone regardless of age, gender, or health condition regardless of whether or not you have a history of respiratory issues or not. Asthma causes the airways to swell up and reduce the surface area available for air to pass through the bronchioles into the bloodstream. This makes it difficult to get enough oxygen into your body and causes shortness of breath, coughing, paleness, and lethargy. While asthma is traditionally associated with either genetics or a permanent condition, functional medicine physicians are finding that the main causes include bad air quality, poor diet and gut health, and food sensitivities – all of which can be addressed with natural remedies. As it turns out, asthma does not have to result in being chained to an inhaler for the rest of your days if you learn to fight the disease at its source.

Recently, functional medicine patients have been able to slowly decrease symptoms and taper off of their inhaler by focusing on improving gut and respiratory health naturally. It is common for patients who suffer from asthma to also have an unbalanced gut microbiome and conditions such as leaky gut. These conditions contribute to an increase in unhealthy inflammation throughout the body, which can manifest itself in a variety of ways – in this case causing inflammation in the sinuses and lungs. If you have ASTHMA and want to know more, schedule a FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION with Dr. Celaya.

In most cases, patients who have undergone a regular dosage of prescription antibiotics can experience damage to the lining of the stomach wall as a result. This causes a variety of side effects that include decreased nutrient absorption, immune response, and also increases the risk of developing leaky gut and inflammation. Asthma is largely a cause of a multitude of physiologic conditions that when all left unattended and out of control, lead to a much greater risk for developing the disease and its symptoms.

How to Naturally Fight Asthma

 While there is no known cure for the condition other than an inhaler and prescription medication, there are ways to fight symptoms and reduce your risk of contracting the disease. This is done by targeting the causes of asthma and inflammation, damaged lung tissue, decreased oxygen utilization, and more.

Some of the steps you can take to curb these symptoms naturally and at the source include:

Improve Your Diet

There are various types of foods that can help to improve oxygen absorption, airway health, and also increase the immune response and protect against inflammation and tissue damage. Anti-inflammatory foods include leafy greens, walnuts, grains, and fish. Removing heavy foods that are pro-inflammatory will also aid in reducing asthma risk as well as increasing energy and overall gut health. Start by slowly removing certain foods for a period of time including those that contain gluten, dairy, and soy.

Supplement With Magnesium and Zinc

Magnesium helps the tissues in your airways relax so you can breathe easier and with less effort. Studies show almost half of Americans consume much less than the recommended amounts of this crucial mineral from food alone and is a reason why asthma risk is high for so many people. Whole-food magnesium sources include nuts, seeds, and leafy greens. It is also recommended to start supplementing with a multivitamin or targeted specific dietary options. Aim for 400 mg of magnesium daily, preferably as magnesium glycinate. Zinc is another important mineral for your immune system and people with deficiencies are at a higher risk for asthma due to the decreased ability for the body to utilize oxygen and produce red blood cells without it. Zinc-rich foods include beans, nuts, and high-quality animal protein. Aim for 15 mg of zinc daily in your food and supplements.

Engage in Deep Breathing Exercises

Deep breathing and meditation exercises can be an easy and effective way to not only fight against the symptoms of asthma but also improve mood and cognition as well. By performing deep breathing exercises at least 3-4 times a week, you can slowly improve overall lung capacity, increase oxygen absorption, and enhance the overall health of the respiratory system. In addition, deep breathing exercises also help to curb stress which is another asthma-inducing contributor. Stress is terrible for those with asthma as it harms your body’s ability to fight infection and inflammation, making it much more susceptible to a variety of conditions.

If you are suffering from asthma or believe you are beginning to develop symptoms, schedule a FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION with Dr. Celaya. By treating the symptoms from the source of the problem, you can improve lung capacity and tissue health naturally without the need for prescription pills or surgery.

This antibiotic is rupturing people’s tendons

This antibiotic is rupturing people’s tendons

Most of us have taken antibiotics to treat infections, whether for a nasty bug, a bad scrape, or after surgery. We tend to trust doctors’ recommendation, however, new data about the alarming side effects of a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones makes it clear they should only be used as a last resort.

Fluoroquinolones are a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics commonly prescribed for infections of the kidneys, urinary tract, sinuses, and respiratory tract.

Known by names such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Cipro XR, Proquin XR, Levaquin (levofloxacin), Floxin, Noroxin, Avelox, Factive, and certain generics, any drug ending in “floxacin” is in this class.

The side effects — sometimes called “getting floxed” — are so severe, the Food and Drug Administration warns to avoid taking this family antibiotics unless there is absolutely no another option.

Fluoroquinolones increase risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture

While fluoroquinolones are known for various side effects, one that may come as a surprise is increased risk of tendinitis and tendon ruptures.

Fluoroquinolones have been shown to weaken and disrupt the underlying structure of tendons. Researchers propose the following causes:

  • A boost in levels of enzymes that damage soft tissue.
  • Interference with the way our bodies replicate DNA, essential to repair of minor damage that running might cause.
  • Disrupted blood flow to collagen in the muscles and tendons.

The Achilles tendon seems to be particularly susceptible, making fluoroquinolones especially problematic for runners.

The average person taking fluoroquinolones has a 70 percent greater risk of tendinopathy and a 30 percent greater risk of full rupture than someone taking a different class of antibiotics.

Signs might include tendon, join, and muscle pain, sometimes soon after taking the drug. However, the side-effect risks can continue for weeks after you stop taking the drug.

The higher your dose and the longer you take fluoroquinolones, the greater your risk of tendon problems.

The most vulnerable populations include:

  • Older people
  • People with kidney disease
  • Patients taking corticosteroid medications

If you would like help understanding that Antibiotics is rupturing Tendons, you can schedule a FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION with Dr. Celaya.

Fluoroquinolones: a long history of side effects

Fluoroquinolones have been required for years to carry warnings to alert doctors and patients of increased risk of certain health issues. As time has revealed the true severity of the effects, the FDA has raised the bar and required them to carry its sternest “black box” warning.

Side effect alerts include:

  • In 2008, the FDA added a black box warning to fluoroquinolones regarding the increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture.
  • In 2011, the risk of worsening symptoms for patients with myasthenia gravis was added to the labeling rule.
  • In 2013, the FDA required labeling updates to reflect potential for irreversible peripheral neuropathy (serious nerve damage).
  • In 2016, the FDA enhanced warnings on all fluoroquinolones to the “black box” level regarding disabling and potentially permanent side effects involving tendons, muscles, joints, nerves and the central nervous system.
  • Because the risk of these side effects generally outweighs potential benefits to patients with acute bacterial sinusitis and uncomplicated urinary tract infections, the FDA determined that these drugs should only be used for as a last resort after other antibiotic classes were tried unsuccessfully.
  • As late as July 2018 the FDA announced a labeling change to strengthen warnings about the risks of mental health side effects and severe blood sugar disturbances.

Blood sugar disturbances. Both high and low blood sugar are already included as a warning on most fluoroquinolone labels, however the FDA added that these low blood sugar levels can lead to coma.

Mental health side effects. Across the fluoroquinolone antibiotic class, a range of mental health side effects are already described on the drug labels, including disturbances in attention, disorientation, agitation, nervousness, memory impairment, and delirium. The revised labels will make these side effects more prominent and more consistent across the drug class to better alert doctors and patients.

Fluoroquinolones help create antibiotic resistant bugs

Another reason to avoid this class of drugs is they appear to be especially good at creating antibiotic resistant bugs.

The effectiveness of fluoroquinolones at destroying bacteria associated with certain infections has dropped from 100 percent to about 70 percent.

Only use fluoroquinolones as a last resort

The spread of knowledge about the increased FDA warnings seems to be slow. While medical groups such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the American Thoracic Society have stopped recommending fluoroquinolones as the first line of defense, studies show little reduction so far in the prescription of fluoroquinolones outside of hospitals.

The FDA recommends that whether you are an athlete, if you have a common infection such as bronchitis, sinusitis, or a simple urinary tract infection, don’t agree to take these drugs unless you have no other option.

If your doctor wants to prescribe fluoroquinolones, make sure to tell them about any history of kidney disease, steroid use, or any previous issues with your tendons or muscles.

And remember that other serious side effects are possible, including nerve damage, confusion, hallucinations, and blood-sugar related coma.

Please contact my office for more information about how to treat infections without this dangerous class of drugs.

Want to know more? Schedule a FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION with Dr. Celaya.

No more egg shaming; cardiovascular risks unfounded

No more egg shaming; cardiovascular risks unfounded

For years we’ve been warned the cholesterol in eggs raises the risk of cardiovascular disease, however new research shows that in people with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes, eggs do not raise cardiovascular risk if they are part of a healthy diet. What’s more, they pose no additional challenges to weight loss. These findings, along with previous research, indicate we need to jettison the outdated stance on cholesterol dangers.

The study emphasized a healthy diet that replaced saturated fats such as butter with monounsaturated fats such as olive and avocado oil. In tracking cholesterol, blood sugar, and blood pressure, no significant differences were found between groups.

Researchers tracked two groups for one year: a high-egg group that ate 12 eggs per week and a low-egg group that ate fewer than two eggs per week. They found the following:

  • In the firsts three months of the study, neither group experienced an increase in cardiovascular risk markers.
  • During the second three months, both groups participated in a weight-loss diet while continuing their egg consumption protocols and achieved equivalent weight loss.
  • In the final six months, both groups achieved equivalent weight loss and showed no adverse changes to cardiovascular risk markers.

Eggs are commonly immune reactive

While the heat is off regarding egg consumption in relation to cholesterol levels, it’s important to know that for many people eggs are immune reactive and need to be avoided. Cyrex Labs offers a variety of panels that test for reactivity to eggs.

“Despite being vilified for decades, dietary cholesterol is understood to be far less detrimental to health than scientists originally thought. The effect of cholesterol in our food on the level of cholesterol in our blood is actually quite small.”

— Dr. Nick Fuller, lead author in the research

Why we need cholesterol

Conventional medicine would have us believe dietary cholesterol is bad, but we need to consume plenty of it in the form of healthy, natural fats.

Cholesterol is found in every cell of our bodies, and without it we wouldn’t survive. We use cholesterol to make vitamin D, cell membranes, and bile acids to digest fats.

Sufficient cholesterol is necessary to digest key antioxidant vitamins A, D, E, and K.

Cholesterol is also a necessary building block for our adrenal hormones and our reproductive hormones such as progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

The brain is largely made up of fat, and the fats we eat directly affect its structure and function, providing insulation around nerve cells, supporting neurotransmitter production, and helping maintain healthy communication between neurons.

Unraveling “good” vs. “bad” cholesterol

We hear a lot about “good” HDL and “bad” LDL cholesterol. They are actually lipoproteins, small fat and protein packages that transport cholesterol in the body.

HDL: High-density lipoprotein. Called “good” cholesterol, HDL helps keep cholesterol away from your arteries and removes excess arterial plaque.

LDL: Low-density lipoprotein. Called “bad” cholesterol, LDL can build up in the arteries, forming plaque that makes them narrow and less flexible, a condition called atherosclerosis.

Triglycerides. Elevated levels of this fat are dangerous and are linked to heart disease and diabetes. Levels can rise from smoking, physical inactivity, excessive drinking, and being overweight. A diet high in sugars and grains also puts you at risk.

Lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a). Made of an LDL part plus a protein (apoprotein a), elevated Lp(a) levels are a very strong risk for heart disease.

When considering test results, your doctor will pay attention to:

  • HDL levels vs. LDL levels
  • Triglyceride levels
  • The ratio between triglycerides to HDL
  • The ratio between total cholesterol and HDL
  • The size of the particles

There are small and large particles of HDL, LDL, and triglycerides. Large particles are practically harmless, while the small, dense particles are more dangerous because they can lodge in the arterial walls, causing inflammation, plaque buildup, and damage leading to heart disease.

More important than knowing your total cholesterol is knowing the ratio between your HDL and your LDL, and especially the size of the particles.

However, according to the Mayo Clinic, many doctors now believe that for predicting your heart disease risk, your total non-HDL cholesterol level may be more useful than calculating your cholesterol ratio. Non-HDL cholesterol contains all the “bad” types of cholesterol; it is figured by subtracting your HDL cholesterol number from your total cholesterol number.

However, either option appears to be a better risk predictor than your total cholesterol level or simply your LDL level.

In some cases, people have a genetic tendency toward extremely high cholesterol. In those situations, it may take more than diet to manage cholesterol levels.

Contact my office to learn more about diet and lifestyle to support healthy cholesterol levels, find out about your cholesterol levels and heart disease risk, and to test for egg reactivity.

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