Gut bacteria play a role in anorexia; eating disorders

Gut bacteria play a role in anorexia; eating disorders

People with eating disorders such as anorexia simply do not experience hunger and satiety in the same way people who have a healthy relationship with food do. New research suggests that the composition of gut bacteria, or the gut microbiome, may play a role in the behavioral aspects of anorexia and eating disorders. For instance, previous research shows a connection between mood disorders such as depression and poor gut microbiome diversity. Less than half of people with eating disorders fully recover, showing that conventional treatments are failing untold numbers of people, the vast majority of them women.

The study showed that patients with anorexia had lower diversity of gut bacteria than healthy individuals. They also found that the less diverse the gut microbiome was the more depression and anxiety patients suffered. The researchers also found that as a patient with anorexia began eating again their gut bacteria diversity was partially restored, which in itself aided in recovery.

Alterations in the gut microbiome can affect how a person’s body functions, how they think, feel, and behave, and how they interact with others.

The gut microbiome is critical not only to regulating mood and behavior, it also plays a vital role in regulating metabolic function, appetite control, and weight.

A better understanding of the role of the gut microbiome in anorexia can help researchers forge new directions in treatment around determining target weight goals, how fast the anorexic patient should gain weight, and what type of diet the anorexic patient should follow to best support the brain’s role in eating disorder behaviors.

The researchers are now investigating whether targeted probiotics could ease the renourishment and refeeding phase of anorexia recovery — many patients struggle with gastric and abdominal distress when reintroducing foods. Customized probiotic therapy could also support the mental and emotional aspects of recovery from an eating disorder.

Gut bacteria targeted in eating disorders

Past research has also shown a link between the gut microbiome and eating disorders, which affect an estimated 5 to 10 percent of the population. A 2015 study from France showed gut bacteria plays a role in eating disorders.

The study looked at mice who had an inflammatory reaction to a protein made by gut bacteria. In essence, the mice responded to these bacteria as if it were an allergy or sensitivity. This immune response caused eating disorders in the mice.

The gut bacteria that triggered this reaction is very similar in structure to a hormone called alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (a-MSH). a-MSH is a satiety hormone that tells you when to feel full. When the immune system attacks the gut bacteria similar to a-MSH, it also attacks the a-MSH due to their structural similarity. This immune reaction can then dysregulate signals around feeding, energy usage, and anxiety.

If you would like help understanding Gut Health, you can schedule a FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION with Dr. Celaya.

When the immune system mistakenly attacks the body

This study is evidence of a “cross-reactive” immune reaction, in which the immune system confuses something in the body with something infectious and attacks both. This is a very common mechanism in autoimmune reactions, such as with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, type 1 diabetes, or multiple sclerosis.

The research suggests that some eating disorders may have an immune reaction driving the psychological disorder.

Tips on addressing eating disorders nutritionally

Although eating disorders are highly complicated and require intensive, sometimes multi-faceted therapeutic approaches, it’s still important to be mindful of nutritional strategies to support the brain and the gut microbiome:

Eliminate processed carbs and sugars as they trigger addictive tendencies metabolically.

Keep blood sugar stable to curbing cravings, food obsession, and relentless hunger. You may need to eat small, frequent meals that include protein initially.

Base your diet on plenty of vegetables and a wide, ever changing diversity of vegetables. This will increase the diversity of your gut microbiome, which promotes psychological health and stability.

Supporting your brain chemicals, or neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters affect your mood, thoughts about yourself, behavior, energy levels, and other aspects of how you feel and function. For instance, you may need serotonin or dopamine support. Serotonin is the neurotransmitter that allows us to feel joy and stave off depression. Dopamine, on the other hand, is necessary to feel self-worth, motivation, and to not experience constant cravings. Both serotonin and dopamine have been shown to play a role in eating disorders. If you have been starving yourself, binging and purging, undereating, or affecting your diet in other ways due to an eating disorder, there is a strong possibility you may be deficient in either one or both of these important neurotransmitters.

Ask my office for more advice on how to support a healthier approach to balanced approach to recovering from eating disorders.

Want to know more? Schedule a FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION with Dr. Celaya.

3 things to calm ASTHMA

3 things to calm ASTHMA

 

Asthma is one of the most common diseases in America, affecting nearly 1 in 12 people. It can affect anyone regardless of age, gender, or health condition regardless of whether or not you have a history of respiratory issues or not. Asthma causes the airways to swell up and reduce the surface area available for air to pass through the bronchioles into the bloodstream. This makes it difficult to get enough oxygen into your body and causes shortness of breath, coughing, paleness, and lethargy. While asthma is traditionally associated with either genetics or a permanent condition, functional medicine physicians are finding that the main causes include bad air quality, poor diet and gut health, and food sensitivities – all of which can be addressed with natural remedies. As it turns out, asthma does not have to result in being chained to an inhaler for the rest of your days if you learn to fight the disease at its source.

Recently, functional medicine patients have been able to slowly decrease symptoms and taper off of their inhaler by focusing on improving gut and respiratory health naturally. It is common for patients who suffer from asthma to also have an unbalanced gut microbiome and conditions such as leaky gut. These conditions contribute to an increase in unhealthy inflammation throughout the body, which can manifest itself in a variety of ways – in this case causing inflammation in the sinuses and lungs. If you have ASTHMA and want to know more, schedule a FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION with Dr. Celaya.

In most cases, patients who have undergone a regular dosage of prescription antibiotics can experience damage to the lining of the stomach wall as a result. This causes a variety of side effects that include decreased nutrient absorption, immune response, and also increases the risk of developing leaky gut and inflammation. Asthma is largely a cause of a multitude of physiologic conditions that when all left unattended and out of control, lead to a much greater risk for developing the disease and its symptoms.

How to Naturally Fight Asthma

 While there is no known cure for the condition other than an inhaler and prescription medication, there are ways to fight symptoms and reduce your risk of contracting the disease. This is done by targeting the causes of asthma and inflammation, damaged lung tissue, decreased oxygen utilization, and more.

Some of the steps you can take to curb these symptoms naturally and at the source include:

Improve Your Diet

There are various types of foods that can help to improve oxygen absorption, airway health, and also increase the immune response and protect against inflammation and tissue damage. Anti-inflammatory foods include leafy greens, walnuts, grains, and fish. Removing heavy foods that are pro-inflammatory will also aid in reducing asthma risk as well as increasing energy and overall gut health. Start by slowly removing certain foods for a period of time including those that contain gluten, dairy, and soy.

Supplement With Magnesium and Zinc

Magnesium helps the tissues in your airways relax so you can breathe easier and with less effort. Studies show almost half of Americans consume much less than the recommended amounts of this crucial mineral from food alone and is a reason why asthma risk is high for so many people. Whole-food magnesium sources include nuts, seeds, and leafy greens. It is also recommended to start supplementing with a multivitamin or targeted specific dietary options. Aim for 400 mg of magnesium daily, preferably as magnesium glycinate. Zinc is another important mineral for your immune system and people with deficiencies are at a higher risk for asthma due to the decreased ability for the body to utilize oxygen and produce red blood cells without it. Zinc-rich foods include beans, nuts, and high-quality animal protein. Aim for 15 mg of zinc daily in your food and supplements.

Engage in Deep Breathing Exercises

Deep breathing and meditation exercises can be an easy and effective way to not only fight against the symptoms of asthma but also improve mood and cognition as well. By performing deep breathing exercises at least 3-4 times a week, you can slowly improve overall lung capacity, increase oxygen absorption, and enhance the overall health of the respiratory system. In addition, deep breathing exercises also help to curb stress which is another asthma-inducing contributor. Stress is terrible for those with asthma as it harms your body’s ability to fight infection and inflammation, making it much more susceptible to a variety of conditions.

If you are suffering from asthma or believe you are beginning to develop symptoms, schedule a FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION with Dr. Celaya. By treating the symptoms from the source of the problem, you can improve lung capacity and tissue health naturally without the need for prescription pills or surgery.

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